Botswana. – The Mokoro of dug-out canoe has become the iconic symbol of the Okavango Delta and I now know why. 

Originally, the only form of transport for fishing and transporting people and goods around the channels, these canoe-like vessels were crafted from tree trunks painstakingly hollowed out using hand-tools. However timber ultimately rots and results in more trees having to be cut down, which isn’t environmentally sustainable, and they are now moulded from fibre-glass. 

There’s nothing quite like being on the quiet and serene channels, dream-like as you glide between the reeds and papyrus, your guide using a long pole or"ngashi“ to drive you as you bird watch, look out for reed frogs and hope for an elephant sighting …

Read: Botswana’s Okavango Delta. With Desert & Delta and #FlyAirlink and for more on how to get there have a look at FlyAirlink and follow them on Twitter | Facebook | Instagram and see the #FlyAirlink hashtag to keep in touch with their routes and special offers.

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Dawn Jorgensen is The Incidental Tourist

The Incidental Tourist is a Personal Travel Blog of a conscious traveller with a deep love for Africa, its people and the environment.

Here I bring you narratives, stories, video and photographs from my travels around the globe, including accounts of gorilla trekking in Uganda, tree planting in Zambia and turtle rescue in Kenya, accommodation and restaurant reviews, as well as details of the conservation efforts that I support.

A self proclaimed earth advocate and beauty seeker, I invite you to join me here and share in my love of sustainable travel.

Dawn Jorgensen
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