Gorilla Trekking in Uganda. A piece for Africa Travel.

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Uganda. – Almost exactly a year ago, I enjoyed an experience of a lifetime. Gorilla Trekking in Uganda. Interestingly, I never posted much on my blog back then, but would now like to share a couple of articles I did have published.

This one was on Africa Travel who I am proud to contribute to.

‘Dian Fossey gave her life protecting these gentle animals and as I sit amongst them, observing the way they play, interact, eat and take power naps between the trees, I have a strong sense that I would do the same. 

I’m in Uganda’s Impenetrable Bwindi National Park, fulfilling a life long dream to see gorillas in the wild. For as long as I can remember this experience has headed up my wish list and now, here I am, overcome with emotion. 

My time in Uganda begins with an overnight in the capital Kampala. Roads are slow and traffic gathers in patient piles near and in the bigger centers. Our first day has us opting for a tour of the city.   

The road trip from Kampala to our campsite on Lake Bunyonyi, takes most of the next day. Our reward is green landscapes, rolling hills, the occasional hub bursting with consummate traders, goats and Ankole cattle with their impressive horns. This is the Africa that I belong to. 

Yet nothing could have prepared me for the surprise of Lake Bunyonyi. Meaning ‘place of little birds’, this is one of the deepest lakes in the world, is home to 29 islands and has a calm dark water idyllic for swimming and kayaking. Tents up for our three nights stay, reality hits. The day is finally here – gorilla trekking day! 

Accessing Bwindi from Bunyonyi is on a mountain pass through thick forest, at base camp we are kitted out with walking sticks and briefed by our guide John. Only about 800 gorillas are left in the wild, with 11 habituated families in Bwindi, which is home to about 400 of them. 

Visits are capped at three groups of 8 people per day and permits need to be bought well in advance, that’s no more than 24 people on the mountain at any given time. There is a chance that you won’t see the gorillas, although trackers go up to find them on a daily basis, as much for their protection as for our convenience. Correct behavior is key. Be quiet, keep a respectable distance, do not try and touch the baby…   

The family that we were to track was BituKura, a large group with an impressive silverback. There are only three habituated families in this part of the reserve and my heart started to pulse at the magnitude of the moment. I was to see one of them. 

Walking stick in hand we followed our guides onto the mountain, taking an established path for the first hour or so before turning into dense vegetation, which the guides cut back with machete to make way for us. Three hours of heavy walking though the muddied forest floor, ferns and fungi, under a canopy of tall trees and with a sweat and breathlessness to match, we came upon the tracker who pointed us to the family. 

Hugging the ridge and moving slowly forward, we caught a glimpse of our first gorilla and all but the joy of the moment was forgotten. 

The time with the gorillas is limited to an hour. We followed them, watching as they chomped on bamboo and headed slowly towards a clearing amongst the trees. A mother and her baby stole our hearts and the silverback the show, as he walked right past where we were sitting. If I had been without common sense, I would have reached out and touched him.   

There are no adequate ways to truly describe the surreal sense of privilege and emotion that I was overcome by in their presence. As an animal lover and advocate, I knew that to sit only a few meters from mountain gorillas and watch the sweet albeit awkward interaction between a 10 month old baby and the silverback, was a memory that I would always hold on to. 

Heading down the mountain for a picnic in a clearing and a chance to excitedly share impressions of our experience, I understood Dian Fossey and have nothing but admiration for her followers who daily put their lives at risk for something greater than us. This giant yet fragile animal that man is yet to learn to respect. 

From there, mud underfoot and hearts aglow we continued our days in Uganda, visiting the Queen Elizabeth National Park on the DRC border, chimpanzee trekking in Kalinzu Forest and eating street food in remote villages. Winston Churchill called Uganda ‘The Pearl of Africa’ and I for one agree.      

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Useful bits of info and tips:

– The hike in the rain forest is a tough one through thick vegetation that could last anything from 2 to 8 hours. Good walking shoes and long trousers with socks tucked over them are recommended. I’d even say long sleeve cotton shirts, as the nettles may get you. Also a rain jacket is a must.
– Its important to have a good level of fitness as this will not only make the experience more enjoyable. I find it refreshing that the gorillas are difficult to reach. It heightens the sense of appreciation that we work for them.
– I took a porter for the hike. The cost to me was US$10. The porters are from the neighbouring village and this is an important part of their income. There are 50 porters on rotation, which means they only have the opportunity to work a couple of times a month. My man Valdi, carried my backpack and took my hand to guide me through the slippery steep bits. I am indebted to him for the help.
– When you find the gorillas, take the photos you need, but don’t live this precious hour from behind your camera. The most useful advise I was given whilst preparing for the experience was to put my camera down and simply enjoy the privilege of being in their company. Do this as the hour flies by.
– There are numerous travel and accommodation options to match your interest or budget, as Africa Travel will tell you.
– Best time of year to visit is between June and September, with March to April being low season. My visit was in February and it was quiet and rather perfect. 

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Note. I travelled with Nomad Tours on their 7-day Gorilla Encounter over-landing trip which was self-funded. I can’t recommend it enough.

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Dawn JorgensenDawn Jorgensen
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The Incidental Tourist

The Incidental Tourist is a Personal Travel Blog of a conscious traveller with a deep love for Africa, its people and the environment.

Here I bring you narratives, stories, video and photographs from my travels around the globe, including accounts of gorilla trekking in Uganda, tree planting in Zambia and turtle rescue in Kenya, accommodation and restaurant reviews, as well as details of the conservation efforts that I support.

A self proclaimed earth advocate and beauty seeker, I invite you to join me and share in my love of sustainable travel – and the rich offerings of our beautiful world.

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